Students glean 7,000 pounds of carrots for dried soup mix | Edvance Christian Schools Association
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Students glean 7,000 pounds of carrots for dried soup mix

Written on November 1st, 2011

[caption id=”attachment_1440” align=”aligncenter” width=”348”]Holland Marsh District Christian School students gleaned about 7,000 pounds of carrots from 12 acres of fields. The carrots were sent to Ontario Christian Gleaners in Cambridge, where they’ll become part of the soup packages sent to Third World countries. Holland Marsh District Christian School students gleaned about 7,000 pounds of carrots from 12 acres of fields. The carrots were sent to Ontario Christian Gleaners in Cambridge, where they’ll become part of the soup packages sent to Third World countries.[/caption]

Bundled up against the cold, 200 Holland Marsh Christian School students collected 7,000 pounds of carrots that will nourish people half a world away.

Principal Rod Berg says last year’s Grade 8 outreach project took place at the Ontario Christian Gleaners in Cambridge. That group uses produce gleaned from farmers’ harvested fields that would otherwise be wasted, and manufactures dried soup mix that is sent to Africa and Haiti.

Berg says the group discovered that many Holland Marsh farmers send produce to the Gleaners, and he wanted to get the students involved.

A parent from the school owns 12 acres of carrot fields, and allowed the students to glean carrots on Tuesday, Oct. 18.

Machines had harvested the fields already, and students picked up the leftovers, which would have been left to rot.

More than 200 students in Grades 1 through 8 collected six large bins of carrots that were sent on to Cambridge.

“It was a perfect fit for our school,” says Berg.

He says the activity “totally ties into our whole vision of being redemptive with God’s creation,” not only in terms of gleaning and being good stewards, but also with the bigger picture of helping with world hunger.

He was grateful students had the opportunity to be part of the process, “digging carrots out of the dirt.”

Many of the students had never been on a farm, he says.

“There they were in their rubber boots, pulling carrots out. It was a lot of fun. It was a pretty special morning to be part of that process.

“We’d love to make a yearly event out of it,” he says.

Having seen what happens at the factory level last year – packing the soup mix in bags, then the bags in bins, it was interesting to see what takes place “on the other end,” says Berg.